George Anastaplo’s books (1971-2012)

Titles, Publishers, Dates of Publication, Pages and Tables of Contents. (More information about the Front Matter for each of these books may be found in “George Anastaplo, A Bibliography,” (posted earlier on anastaplo.wordpress.)

 I. The Constitutionalist:  Notes on the First Amendment (Southern Methodist University Press, 1971), pp. i-xiii, 1-826.

Preface; I. “A Journal of Proceedings”; II. “The Supreme Law of  the Land”; IV. “All Legislative Power Herein Granted”; V. “Abridging the Freedom of Speech”; VI. “The Powers Not Delegated to the United States”; VII. “A More Perfect Union”; VIII. “The Blessings of Liberty”; IX. “We Do Ordain and Establish”; Appendices:  A. Stages in the First Congress of the First Amendment; B. Schenck v. United States: Circular and Indictment; C. Due Process and the World of Commerce; D. Conspiracy and the Judge:  A Trial in Chicago; E. Academic Freedom and Academic Responsibility: Principiis Obsta; F. In re George Anastaplo (1950-1961); Notes; Indexes

II. Human Being and Citizen:  Essays on Virtue, Freedom, and the Common Good (Swallow Press, 1975), pp. i-xiii, 1-332.

Preface; Prologue:  I. Dissent in Athens: An Invocation of First Principles; II.   Human Being and Citizen: A Beginning to the Study of Plato’s Apology of  Socrates; “Political Theory”:  III.  The American Heritage:  Words and Deeds; IV.   Natural Right and the American Lawyer; V.  Liberty and Equality; VI.  Law and  Morality; VII. In Search of the Soulless “Self”; VIII. Pollution, Ancient and  Modern; Rites of Passage: IX. What’s Really Wrong with George Anastaplo?;  “The Practice of Politics”; X.  Obscenity and Common Sense; XI.  Canada and  Quebec Separatism; XII.  Vietnam and the Constitution; XIII.  The Case for  Supporting Israel; XIV.  Impeachment and Statesmanship; XV.  Race, Law and  Civilization; Epilogue: XVI.  Citizen and Human Being: Thoreau, Socrates, and  Civil Disobedience; XVII.  On Death: One by One, Yet All Together; Index

III. The Artist as Thinker:  From Shakespeare to Joyce (Swallow Press, Ohio University Press, 1983), pp. i-xv, 1-499

Preface; Prologue:  The Artist as Thinker; I. William Shakespeare; II.  John Milton; III.  John Bunyan; IV.  Jane Austen; V.  Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley; VI.  Charles Dickens; VII.  Herman Melville; VIII.  Matthew Arnold; IX.  Lewis Carroll; X.  Mark Twain; XI.  William S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan; XII.  Robert Louis Stevenson; XIII.  James Joyce; Epilogue:  The Thinker as Artist [on Leo Strauss]; Appendixes: On Art, Nature, and Principles of Interpretation: A.  Primer on the Good, the True, and the Beautiful; B.  Citizenship, Prudence, and the Classics; C.  What Is a Classic? D.  Art, Craftsmanship, and Community; E.  Art and Morality; F.  Art and Politics; G.  Art, Common Sense, and Tyranny; Notes; Index

IV. The Constitution of 1787:  A Commentary (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1989), pp. i-xviii , 1-340 (published in a Chinese translation in 2011 through the Chinese Connection Agency)

Preface; 1.  The Constitution of the Americans;  2. Preamble;  3. Article I, Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6; 4.  Article I, Section 7;  5. Article I, Section 8;  6. Article I, Sections 9 & 10;  7. Anglo-American Constitutionalism;  8. Article II, Section 1;  9. Article II, Sections 2, 3, & 4;  10. Article III, Sections 1 & 2;  11. Article III, Sections 2 & 3;  12. The State Constitutions in 1787;  13. Article IV;  14. Article V;  15. Article VI;  16. Article VII;  17. The Americans of the Constitution; Appendixes and Sources:  A. The Declaration of Independence (1776);  B. The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union (1777-1789);  C. Congressional Resolution Calling the Federal Convention (1787);  D. The Northwest Ordinance (1787);  E. The United States Constitution (1787);  F. Chart for Article I, Section 8 (Lecture No. 5);  G. Resolution of the Federal Convention Providing for Transmittal of the Proposed Constitution to the Confederation Congress (1787);  H. Letter Transmitting the Proposed Constitution from the Federal Convention to the Confederation Congress (1787);  I. Congressional Resolution Transmitting the Proposed Constitution to the States (1787);  J. Congressional Act for Putting the Constitution into Operation (1988);  K. Amendments to the Constitution of the United States (1791-1971);  L. Proposed Amendments to the Constitution Not Ratified by the States (1789-1978);  M. The Gettysburg Address (1863); Notes; Index

V. The American Moralist:  On Law, Ethics and Government (Ohio University Press, 1992), pp. i-xxiii, 1-624

Preface; Prologue: I: “Who Am I?” (1985); 2. Ancients and Moderns: 2-A. Aristotle on Law and Morality (1982); 2-B. Kant on Metaphysics and Morality (1985); Principles and Questions: A. The Old Way: 3. Plato and the Sources of Tyranny (1983); 4. Xenophon and the Needs of Tyrants (1985); 5. Maimonides on Revelation and Reason (1979); B. The American Way: 6. Science and Politics, Old and New (1979); 7. Aristocratic Imperatives in a Democratic Age (1977); 8. On Patriotism (1988); C. The New Ways: 9. Some Questions About Nietzsche (1980); 10. Some Questions About the Freudian Persuasion (1973); 11. Some Questions About “Existentialism” (1982); 12. Heidegger and the Need for Tyranny (1981); 13. Orwell and the Limits of Tyranny (1983); Issues of the Day: A. Catalogues of “Cases”: 14. The Moral Foundation of the Law (1979); 15. The Occasions of Freedom of Speech (1975); 16. The Occasions of Religious Liberty (1979); B. The Use and Abuse of the First Amendment: 17. Vietnam and the Presumption of Citizenship (1966); 18. The Pentagon Papers and the Abolition of Television (1972); 19. Legal Realism and the New Journalism (1983); 20. Speech and Law in a Free Country (1983); C. Public Opinion and Majority Rule: 21. On the Hunting of Witches Today (1981); 22. The Moral Majority:   The New Abolitionists? (1981); D. Nature and Revelation:  23. The Status of Nature: 23-A. The Challenge of Creationism (1985); 23-B. On Speaking to and For Mankind (1982); 24. Women and the Law (1980); E. Sovereignty of the Law: 25. Gun Control, Citizen Control (1984); 26. Human Nature and the Criminal Law (1976); 27. Medicine and the Law: 27-A. The Discipline of Medicine (1983); 27-B. Abortion and Technology (1989); 28. Psychiatry and the Law (1979); 29. On Capital Punishment (1984); F. Politics and Government: 30. On Impeachment (1974); 31. City Life; 31-A. The Federal Idea and the City (1988); 31-B. Religion and the City (1988); 31-C. The Babylonian Captivity of the Public Schools (1974); 31-D. Chicago Politics After Daley (1977); 32. Heroes and Hostages (1981); 33. Of Counsel—and the Limits of Politics (1978); G. Lessons from Abroad: 34. The Greek Case: 34A. Politics versus Ideology (1974); 34-B. The Colonels and the Press (1985); 35. Politics, Glory, and Religion (1984); 36. In God We Trust? (1984); 37. Civil Disobedience and Statesmanship (1984); 38. Eastern European Prospects and the United States (1990); Epilogue: 39. Lessons from Life (1986); 40. Summing Up: 40-A. Body and Soul (1975); 40-B. The Teacher as Learner (1984); 40-C. On Giving Thanks in Dark Times (1982); Index

VI. The Amendments to the Constitution: A Commentary (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995), pp. i-xxi, 1-466

Preface; 1. The Intentions of the Federal Convention of 1787; 2. The Federal Convention and a Bill of Rights; 3. Predecessors to the American Bill of Rights; 4. The Purposes and Effects of the Bill of Rights of 1791; 5. Amendment I; 6. Amendments II, III, and IV; 7. Amendments V, VI, VII, and VIII; 8. Amendments IX, X, XI, and XII; 9. Education in the New Republic; 10. The Confederate Constitution of 1861; 11. The Emancipation Proclamation of 1862-1863; 12. Amendments XIII, XIV, and XV; 13. Amendments XVI, XVII, and XIX; 14. Amendments XVIII and XXI; 15. Amendments XX, XXII, XXIII, and XXV; 16. Amendments XXIII, XXIV, XXVI, and XXVII; 17. The Constitution in the Twenty-first Century; Appendixes and Sources: A. Magna Carta (1215); B. Thomas More’s Petition to Henry VIII on Parliamentary Freedom of Speech (1521); C. The Petition of Right (1628); D. The English Bill of Rights (1689); E. Declarations by American Congresses (1765-1776): E-1. Declaration of Rights & Grievances by the Stamp Act Congress (1765); E-2. Declaration and Resolves by the First Continental Congress (1774); E-3. The Declaration of Independence (1776); F. Declaration of Rights (1776-1780): F-1. Virginia Declaration of Rights (1776); F-2. Massachusetts Declaration of Rights (1780); G. Virginia Statute of Religious Liberty (1785); H. The Principal Bill of Rights Discussions in James Madison’s Notes of Debates in the Federal Convention (1787): H-1. Monday, August 20, 1787; H-2. Wednesday, September 12, 1787; H-3. Saturday, September 15, 1787; I. Amendment Proposals by the Last States to Ratify the Constitution before Its Initial Implementation (1788): I-1. Virginia Ratification Convention (June 26-27, 1788); I-2. New York Ratification Convention (July 16, 1788); J. Stages of the Bill of Rights in the First Congress and in the State Legislatures (1789-1791): J-1. James Madison’s Proposals in the House of Representatives (June 8, 1789); J-2. Amendments Reported by a House of Representatives Committee (July 28, 1789); J-3. Amendments Passed by the House of Representatives (August 24, 1789); J-4. Amendments Passed by the Senate (September 9, 1789); J-5. Amendments Proposed by Congress for Ratification by the States (September 25, 1789); J-6. Ratification Returns from the States (November 20, 1789-December 15, 1791); K. Letters Exchanged by Thomas Jefferson and John Adams (1814): K-1. Letter from Thomas Jefferson to John Adams (July 5, 1814); K-2. Letter from John Adams to Thomas Jefferson (July 16, 1814); L. Anglo-American Responses to Slavery (1771-1863): L-1. Somerset’s Case (1771-1772); L-2. The Constitution of the Confederate States of America (1861); L-3. The Emancipation Proclamation (1862-1863); M. The Constitution of 1787 with Amendments (1787-1992): M-1. The Constitution of 1787 (1787); M-2. Amendments to the Constitution of 1787 (1791-1992); Notes; Index

VII. The Thinker as Artist:  From Homer to Plato & Aristotle (Ohio University Press, 1997), pp. i-xiii, 1-405

Preface; Prologue; I. Homer: Part One. On the Iliad; Part Two. On the Odyssey; II. Sappho: On the Poems; III. Pindar: Part One. On the Odes; Part Two. On Delphi; Addendum: Deity and Statesmanship; IV. Aesehylus. On the Oresteia; V. Sophocles. On the Oedipus Tyrannos; VI. Euripides: Part One. On the Hippolytus; Part Two On the Rhesus; VII. Aristophanes: Part One. On the Birds; Addendum. Aristophanes’ Speech in Plato’s Symposium; Part Two. On the Noble and the Just; Addendum. The Ode to Man in Sophocles’ Antigone; Part Three. On the Clouds; Addendum. The Uses of Nature in Aristophanes’ Clouds; VIII. Herodotus. Part One. On the History; Part Two. On the Gyges Story; IX. Thucydides. On the Peloponnesian War; X. Gorgias. On the Nature, Helen, and Palamedes; XI. Plato: Part One. On the Timaeus; Part Two. On the Doctrine of the Ideas; Addendum. The Uses of Eidos and Idea in Plato’s Republic; XII. Aristotle. On the Nicomachean Ethics; XIII. Raphael. Part One. On The School of Athens; Part Two. On The School of Rome; Epilogue; Selected Bibliography; Index

VIII. Campus Hate-Speech Codes and Twentieth Century Atrocities (The Edwin Mellen Press, 1997), pp i-vi, 1-121

Preface; Part One. Campus Hate-Speech Codes and the Constitution: I. Hate   Speech and the First Amendment; II. Hate Speech, Civility, and Education; III. A  “Hate Speech” Encounter; IV. Campus Hate Speech and a Sense of Decorum;  Part Two. Reminders of the Dreadful Consequences That Hateful Speech Can  Have: I. The Fate of the Jews in Greece and Italy During the Second World War;  II. Where Does One Start? On the United States, the Balkans, and Islam; III. The  Needs of a Free People: Reflections on the Oklahoma City Bombing; Part Three.  A Return to Fundamental Questions: I. Is the Self Grounded in the Soul? II. Are  the Moral Virtues Grounded in Nature? Index

IX. Liberty, Equality & Modern Constitutionalism: A Source Book: Volume One: From Socrates and Pericles to Thomas Jefferson; Volume Two: From George III to Hitler and Stalin (Focus Publishing/ R. Pullins Company, 1999).

Volume One: pp. 1-xvi, 1-278; Volume Two: pp. i-x, 1-299. The authors drawn on include (in Volume One): Plato, Pericles, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Benjamin Franklin, Niccolò Machiavelli, William Shakespeare, Leo Strauss, John Milton, William Blackstone, John Stuart Mill, James Fitzjames Stephen, Aristotle, Alexander H. Stephens, Hugo Grotius, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Lord Mansfield, John Wesley, and Patrick Henry. They include (in Volume Two): Publius (of The Federalist), Thomas Jefferson, Frederick Douglass, John C. Calhoun, Abraham Lincoln, Plato, Adam Smith, Benjamin Franklin, Milton Friedman, Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, John Paul II, Friedrich Nietzsche, Alexis de Tocqueville, Harry A. Blackmun, Andrew Jackson, Woodrow Wilson, Charles T. Schenck, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., Winston S. Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Robert M. Hutchins, John C. Ford, Lawrence L. McReavy, Thurgood Marshall, Andrew Johnson, Richard M. Nixon, William J. Clinton and Hugo La Fayette Black.

X. Campus Hate-Speech Codes, Natural Right, and Twentieth Century Atrocities (The Edwin Mellen Press, 1999), pp. i-vii, 1-176

Preface; Part One. Campus Hate-Speech Codes and the Constitution:  I. Hate  Speech and the First Amendment; II. Hate Speech, Civility, and Education; III. A  “Hate Speech” Encounter; IV. Campus Hate Speech and a Series of Decorum;  Part Two. Reminders of the Dreadful Consequences that Hateful Speech Can  Have: I. Did Anyone “In Charge” Know What He Was Doing? The Thirty Years  War of the Twentieth Century; II. The Fate of the Jews in Greece and Italy During  the Second World War; III. Where Does One Start? On the United States, the  Balkans, and Islam; IV. The Needs of a Free People:  Reflections on the   Oklahoma City Bombing; Part Three. A Return to Fundamental Questions: I. Is  the Self Grounded in the Soul? II. Are the Moral Virtues Grounded in Nature? III.  Natural Law or Natural Right? Index

XI. Abraham Lincoln:  A Constitutional Biography [Preferred Title:   Thoughts on Abraham Lincoln: A Discourse on Prudence] (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 1999), pp. i-x, 1-373

Prologue; 1. The Declaration of Independence:  An Introduction; 2. The Declaration of Independence:  On Rights and Duties; 3. The Northwest Ordinance; 4. Slavery and the Federal Convention of 1787; 5. The Common Law and the Organization of Government; 6. Alexis de Tocqueville on Democracy in America; 7. John C. Calhoun and Slavery; 8. Southern Illinois’s Abraham Lincoln; 9. The Poetry of Abraham Lincoln; 10. The “House Divided” Speech; 11. The Lincoln-Douglas Debate; 12. The First Inaugural Address; 13. The Fourth of July Message to Congress; 14. The Emancipation Proclamation; 15. The Gettysburg  Address; 16. The Second Inaugural Address; 17. Abraham Lincoln’s Legacies; Epilogue; Notes; Index

XII. But Not Philosophy: Seven Introductions to Non-Western Thought (Lexington Books, 2002), pp. i-xxiv, 1-397

Foreword, by John Van Doren; Preface; 1. Mesopotamian Thought:  The  Gilgamesh Epic; 2. “Ancient” African (Including Egyptian) Thought; 3. Hindu  Thought:  The Bhagavad Gita; 4. Confucian Thought:  The Analects; 5. Buddhist  Thought; 6. Islamic Thought:  The Koran; 7.  North American Indian Thought;  Appendices:  A. On Beginnings; B.  On the Human Soul, Nature, and the Moral  Virtues; C.  On the Use, Neglect, and Abuse of Veils:   The Parliaments of the  World’s Religions; Index

XIII. Plato’s “Meno”: Translation with Annotations (with Laurence Berns, St. John’s College, Annapolis) (Focus Publishing/ R. Pullins Company, 2004), pp. i-viii, 1-86

Introduction; Plato’s Meno; Notes; Appendix A: Oaths in the Meno; Appendix B:  Geometrical Diagrams

XIV. On Trial:  From Adam & Eve to O. J. Simpson (Lexington Books, 2004), pp. i-xx, 1-499

Foreword by Abner J. Mikva; Preface; Introduction; 1. From Adam and Eve to Faustus: 1-A. Adam, Eve, and the Serpent; 1-B. Lucifer and Faustus; 2. Clytemnestra, Electra, and Orestes: 2-A. The Choruses in Aeschylus’ Oresteia; 2-B. The Character of a Matricide; 2-C. The Hunting of Orestes; 2-D. Queries About the Oresteia; 3. Jonah and the Ninevites; 4. Oedipus, Creon, and Antigone: 4-A. Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannos; 4-B. Sophocles’ Antigone; 4-C. Anouihl’s Antigone; 5. Abraham and Kierkegaard; 6. Socrates of Athens: 6-A. Plato’s Meno; 6-B. Xenophon’s Apology of Socrates; 7. Jesus of Nazareth: 7-A. The Gospel of Matthew; 7-B. the Gospel of Mark; 8. Joan of Arc; 9. Shylock and Shakespeare; 10. Thomas More, the King, and the Pope; 11. John P. Altgeld and the Haymarketers; 12. Notorious Defendants in Our Time: 12-A. Hermann Wilhelm Goering et al.; 12-B. Julius Rosenberg, Ethel Rosenberg, and Morton Sobell; 12-C. The Communist Party of the United States; 12-D. David Dellinger et al.; 12-E. Richard M. Nixon et al.; 13. From Spiro to Agnew to O. J. Simpson; Conclusion; Appendixes: In re George Anastaplo: A. Subversion, Then and Now (1987); B. On Representing Oneself (2001); C. Chance and the Good Life (2001); D. Why Did You Do It? (2003); Index

XV. The Constitutionalist: Notes on the First Amendment (Lexington Books, 2005), pp.i-lxxix, 1-826

Foreword to the 2004 Edition by Laurence Berns; Preface to the 2004 Edition; 2004 Addenda for The Constitutionalist: Part 1. The Constitutionalist: Corrections and Refinements of the Text and Notes; Part 2. The Constitutionalist: Extended Modifications of the Text and Notes; Part 3. The Constitutionalist: Modifications of the Indexes; Part 4. George Anastaplo, Bibliographies; Part 5. George Anastaplo, Books and Book-length Articles; Part 6. Various Things by George Anastaplo Referred to in the 2004 Preface to The Constitutionalist; Part 7. Reviews of The Constitutionalist; Part 8. Other Assessments of George Anastaplo’s Career and Work (Selected); Part 9. Additional Texts Referred to in the 2004 Preface; Preface to the 1971 Edition; I. “A Journal of Proceedings”; II. “The Supreme Law of the Land”; III. “Congress Shall Make No Law”; IV. “All Legislative Power Herein Granted”; V. “Abridging the Freedom of Speech”; VI. “The Powers Not Delegated to the United States”; VII. “A More Perfect Union”; VIII. “The Blessings of Liberty”; IX. “We Do Ordain and Establish”; Appendixes: A. Stages in the First Congress of the First Amendment; B. Schenck v. United States: Circular and Indictment; C. Due Process and the World of Commerce; D. Conspiracy and the Judge:  A Trial in Chicago; E. Academic Freedom and  Academic Responsibility: Principiis Obsta; F. In re George Anastaplo (1950-1961); Notes; Indexes

XVI. Reflections on Constitutional Law (The University Press of Kentucky, 2006), pp. i-xiii, 1-269

Preface; Part One: 1. An Introduction to Constitutionalism; 2. Magna Carta   (1215); 3. The Declaration of Independence (1776); 4. The Articles of  Confederation (1776-1789); The Northwest Ordinance (1787); 5. Emergence of  the Constitution (1786-1791); 6. Marbury v. Madison (1803); 7. Swift v. Tyson  (1842), Erie Railroad Company v. Tompkins (1938); 8. Martin v. Hunter’s Lessee  (1816), M’Culloch v. Maryland (1819); 9. Gibbons v. Ogden (1824); 10. Burdens  on Interstate Commerce (1905-1981); 11. Missouri v. Holland (1920), Wickard v.  Filburn (1942); 12. The Presidency and the Constitution; 13. A Government of  Enumerated Powers? Part Two: 1. Realism and the Study of Constitutional Law;  2. The Challenges of Skepticism for the Constitutionalist; 3. Constitutionalism  and the Common Law: The Erie Problem Reconsidered; 4. The Confederate  Constitution (1861-1865); 5. The Japanese Relocation Cases (1943, 1944); 6.  Calder v.Bull (1798); Barron v. Baltimore (1833); 7. Corfield v. Coryell (1823)  and the Privileges and Immunities Puzzles; 8. The Slaughter-House Cases (1872);  A False Start?; 9. The Civil Rights Cases (1883); Plessy v. Ferguson (1948): More False Starts? 10. Shelley v. Kraemer (1948); Brown v. Board of Education (1954, 1955); 11. Affirmative Action and the Fourteenth Amendment; 12. San Antonio Independent School District v. Rodriguez (1973); 13. Whose Vote, Count for What –and When?; Appendixes: A. Magna Carta (1215); B. The Declaration of Independence (1776); C. The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union (1776-1789); D. The Northwest Ordinance (1787); E. The United States Constitution (1787); F. A Chart for Article I, Section 8 of the United States Constitution; G. The Amendments to the United States Constitution (1791-1992); H. Proposed Amendments to the United States Constitution Not Ratified by the States (1789-1978); I. The Confederate Constitution (1861); J. Roster of Cases and Other Materials Drawn On; Index

XVII. Reflections on Freedom of Speech and the First Amendment (The University Press of Kentucky, 2007), pp. i-xviii, 1-321

Preface; Part One: 1. Plato’s Apology of Socrates; 2. The Ministry of St. Paul; 3. Thomas More and Parliamentary Immunity (1521); 4. John Milton’s Areopagitica; 5. William Blackstone, Patrick Henry, and Edmund Burke on Liberty (1765-1790); 6. The Declaration of Independence (1776); the Northwest Ordinance (1787); 7. Constitutionalism and the Workings of Freedom of Speech; 8. The Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom (1786); 9. The Emergence of a National Bill of Rights (1789-1791); 10. The Organization of the First Amendment; 11. The Sedition Act of 1798; 12. John Stuart Mill’s On Liberty (1859); 13. Freedom of Speech and the Coming of the Civil War; Part Two: 1. The Naïve Folly of Realists: A Defense of Justice Black (1937-1971); 2. Schenck v. United States (1919); Abrams v. United States (1919); 3. Debs v. United States (1919); Gitlow v. New York (1925); 4. Winston S. Churchill and the Cause of Freedom; 5. Dennis v. United States (1951); the Rosenberg Case (1950-1953); 6. Cohen v. California (1971); Texas v. Johnson (1989); 7. The Pentagon Papers Case (1971); 8. Obscenity and the Law; 9. Private Property and Public Freedom; 10. Buckley v. Valeo (1976); 11. The Regulation of Commercial Speech; 12. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948); 13. The Future of the First Amendment; Appendixes: A. The Declaration of Independence (1776); B. The United States Constitution (1787); C. The Amendments to the United States Constitution (1787); D. Thomas More, Petition to Henry VIII on Parliamentary Freedom of Speech (1521); E. The Virginia Statute of Religious Liberty (1786); F. Some Stages of the Religion/Speech/Press/Assembly/Petition Provisions in the First Congress (1789); G. The Sedition Act (1798); H. The Virginia Resolutions (1798); I. Report of a Virginia House of Delegates Minority in Opposition to the Virginia Resolutions (1799); J. Thomas Jefferson, The First Inaugural Address (1801); K. Schenck v. United States Leaflet (1917); L. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948); M. George Anastaplo, On the Alcatraz Imprisonment of a Convicted Soviet Spy (1954); N. George Ansataplo, An Obscenity-Related Case from Dallas (1989-1990); O. Cases and Other Materials Drawn On; Index

XVIII. The Bible: Respectful Readings (Lexington Books, 2008, (pp. i-viii, 1-401).

1. On Taking the Bible Seriously Again; 2. On Prophecy and Freedom; 3. On    Biblical Thought; 4. Cain and Abel; 5. Rebekah, Isaac, and Jacob; 6. Joseph; 7.    Moses in Egypt; 8. Moses at Sinai; 9. The Ten Commandments; 10. David; 11.    Solomon; 12. Isaiah; 13. Job; 14. Jesus; 15. The Lord’s Prayer; 16. The Nicene    Creed; 17. On the Yearning for Personal Immortality; Appendix A. Reason and    Revelation: On Leo Strauss; Appendix B. Reason and Revelation: On Odysseus    and Polyphemos; Appendix C. On the Status of the Political Order; Appendix D.    On Being and One’s Own; Appendix E. Leo Strauss and Judaism Revisited;    Appendix F. On Beginnings (with Endnotes); Appendix G. Shakespeare’s Bible;    Appendix H. Countdown to the Millennium: A Look at The Revelation of St.    John the Divine; Appendix I. John Locke and The Reasonableness of Christianity;   J. The Holocaust and the Divine Ordering of Human Things; Appendix K.     Yearnings for the Divine and the Natural Animation of Matter; Endnotes (for Chapters 1-17); Index

XIX. Reflections on Life, Death, and the Constitution (The University Press of Kentucky, 2009), pp. i-xii, 1-299

Preface; Part One: 1. On Understanding the Others; 2. Life and Not-Life in Thueydides’ Funeral Oration; 3. Death and Resurrection in Euripides’ Bacchae; 4. Resurrection and Death in Everyman; 5. John Milton and the Limits of the Garden of Eden; 6. Human Mortality and the Declaration of Independence; 7. Time and the Constitution; 8. Fyodor Dostoyevsky and the Modern Project; 9. Public Health and Private Consciences; 10. The Flag Salute Cases  (1940, 1943); 11. Conscientious Objectors and Military Conscription; 12. Obliteration Bombing, Civilian Casualties, and the Laws of War; 13. Do All Somehow Aim at the Good? Part Two: 1. Shakespeare’s Hamlet and the  Elusiveness of the Good; 2. Unconventional Religious Duties and the Good Life; 3. Griswold v. Connecticut (1965) and the Prevention of Conception; 4. Roe v.  Wade (1973) and the Law of Abortion; 5. Planned Parenthood v. Casey (1922) and the Persistence of the Abortion Issue; 6. Capital Punishment and the United States Supreme Court; 7. Capital Punishment Reconsidered; 8. Nancy Cruzan and “The Right to Die;” 9. Washington v. Glucksberg (1997) and Assisted Suicide; 10. The Legislation of Morality and the Problem of Pain; 11. Evolution and the Law; 12. Life and Death in Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address; 13. The  Unseemly Fearfulness of Our Time; Appendixes: A. The Declaration of Independence (1776); B. The United States Constitution (1787); C. The Amendments to the United States Constitution (1791-1992); D. Pericles, The Funeral Address (431 B.C.E); E. On  Death and Dying: Ancient, Christian, and Modern: I. Aristotle: A Fine Death? II. John Mason Neale: Ye Need Not Fear the Grave? III. William Shakespeare: Does Conscience make Cowards of As All? F. Patrick Henry, Give me Liberty or Give Me Death (1775); G. Abraham Lincoln, The Gettysburg Address (1863); H. George Anastaplo, On the Ultron and the Foundations of Things (1974); I. Life, Death, and the Systematic Perversions of Law (2000); J. Cases and Other Materials Drawn On; Index

XX. The Christian Heritage: Problems and Prospects (Lexington Books, 2010), pp. i-xviii, 1-446

Foreword, Martin E. Marty; Prologue; 1. The Triumph of Christianity; 2. Beowulf  (521-800?); 3. Moses Maimonides (1135-1204); 4. Thomas Aquinas (1224-1274);  5. Dante Alighieri (1265-1321); 6. Giovanni Boccaccio (1313-1375); 7. Geoffrey  Chaucer (1340-1400); 8. Thomas More (1478-1535); 9. Martin Luther (1483-1548); 10. Michel Eyquem de Montaigne (1533-1592); 11. Christopher Marlowe   (1564-1593); 12. Blaise Pascal (1623-1662); 13. Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790);  14. Thomas Paine (1737-1809); 15. Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860); 16.  Charles Darwin (1809-1882); 17. Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900); 18. The  Modern Greek Character and Islam; 19. A Memo to Protestants; 20. Public Funds  and Church-Sponsored Schools; 21. Reason versus Revelation, Reconsidered; 22.  The Legislation of Morality and the Law of Abortion; 23. Animal Sacrifices and  the Sacrifices of Morality; 24. On Physician-Assisted Suicide; 25. Mortality and  Happiness; 26. The Case for Israel; Epilogue; Appendices: Further Thoughts on  the Moral Challenges of Our Time: Appendix A. European Jews, Their  “Christian” Neighbors, and the Holocaust (2000); Appendix B. On the Right to  Live as a Beggar: Reflections by Moonlight (2001-2002); Appendix C. On  Knowing Oneself: Projections and Introspection (2003); Appendix D. On Facts  and Theories: Lessons for Law Students from Ptolemy’s Astronomy (2004);  Appendix E. Christmas Stories (2004); Appendix F. Still Another Look at Taoism  (2005); Appendix G. On Properly Knowing Oneself (2006); Appendix I. Come,  All Ye Faithful: St. John Chrysostom and the Meaning of Christmas (2006);  Appendix J. An Academic Autobiography, by Way of St. Thomas and St. Ignatius  (2008); Appendix K. Struggles for the Soul of Christendom (2008); Appendix L.  On Trial, Knowing What One Is Trying to Do: The Mystery of Evil (2008);  Appendix M (with Eva Brann). Glimpses of Leo Strauss, Jacob Klein, and St. John’s College (2009); Notes; Index

XXI. Reflections on Slavery and the Constitution (Lexington Books, 2012), pp. i-xv, 1-317

Preface; Part One: 1. Slavery in Ancient Greece; 2. Slavery and the Bible; 3. Hugo Grotius on Slavery and the Law of Nations (1625); 4. Somerset v. Stewart (1771-1772) and Its Consequences; 5. John Wesley and the Sins of Slavery (1774); 6. The Declaration of Independence and the Issue of Slavery (1776); 7. Human Nature and the Constitution; 8. The Compromise with Respect to Equality in the Constitution (1787); 9. The States in the Constitution (1787) 10. The Federalist on Slavery and the Constitution (1787-1788); 11. Hannah More and Other Poets on Slavery (1798-1847); 12. Suppression of the International Slave Trade; 13. John Quincy Adams and John C. Calhoun on the Abolitionist Petitions to Congress; Part Two: 1. The Fugitive Slave Laws (1793, 1850); 2. Frederick Douglass and Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852); 3. Chief Justice Taney and the Dred Scott Case (1857); 4. The Dred Scott Case Dissenters (1857); 5. Abraham Lincoln in Cincinnati (1859, 1861); 6. Stephen A. Douglas in Montgomery (November 1860); 7. The Ordinances of Secession (1860-1861); 8. The Declarations of Causes Issued by Seceding States (1860-1861); 9. The Confederate Constitution (1861); 10. Abraham Lincoln, the Civil War Generals, and Slavery (1861-1865); 11. Ralph Waldo Emerson and the Emancipation Proclamation (1862); 12. The Civil War Amendments (1865, 1868, 1870); 13. The Lost Cause Transformed; Appendixes: A. The Declaration of Independence (1776); B. The Northwest Ordinance (1787); C. The United States Constitution (1787), D. The Amendments to the United States Constitution (1791-1992), E. The Confederate Constitution (1861); F. On the Relations of Slaves to Masters Who Considered Them “Nothings”; G. Roster of Cases and Other Materials Drawn On; Index

BOOKS READY FOR PUBLICATION

A. Reflections on Religion, the Divine, and the Constitution (Lexington Books, 2013?)

Preface; Part One. 1. Euripides on the Use and Abuse of Revelation in the Service  of the Political Order; 2. The Divine, an Unsettling Duality, and the Conduct of  One’s Life: Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannos Revisited; 3. On Aristophanes’  Clouds; 4. Socrates’ Dangerous Piety; 5. Plato and the Divine in Human Affairs;  6. Maimonides and Others on Faith, Philosophy, and Governing Principles; 7.  Conscience and Citizenship; 8. El Greco and His Successors; 9. Míguel de  Cervantes on Death, the Divine, and the Proper Ordering of Human Affairs; 10.  Thomas Hobbes on Church and State; 11. John Milton’s Paradise Epics and the  Divinely-Ordained Redemption of the Human Race; 12. Challenges Posed by the  Aztecs; 13. The Holocaust and the Divine Ordering of Human Affairs; Part Two.  1. Nature and the Divine in the Declaration of Independence; 2. Benedict Arnold,  Providence, and the Fates of Citizens and of Nations; 3. Benjamin Franklin and  the Workings of the Divine –At Least in America; 4. “In the Year of [What]  Lord?” 5. Political Symbols and the Sacred in the United States; 6. Thomas  Jefferson and  Religious Liberty; 7. Abraham Lincoln and the Almighty; 8.  Presidential Invocations of the Divine; 9. Presidential Farewell Addresses; 10.  Revelation, Human Understanding, and the Ordering of the Good Life: The  “Mormon” Movement; 11. Revelation and the Use of the United States Postal  Service: The “I Am” Movement; 12. An Earth Elsewhere? 13. Yearnings for the  Divine and the Natural Animation of Matter; Appendices; Bibliography; Index

B. Further Thoughts on Abraham Lincoln: A Discourse on Chance and Public Life

Foreword by Harry V. Jaffa; Prologue; Part One: Looking Ahead To and Beyond  the Lincoln Presidency. 1. A Preliminary Conversation; 2. The Bank Bill  Controversy of 1791: A Precursor to the Secession Crisis of the 1860s; 3. A  Murder Trial in Springfield; 4. The Everyday Lawyer in a President for the Ages;  5. Abraham Lincoln, a Lawyer-President; 6. Our Disputed “Created Equal”  Heritage; 7. The Declaration of Independence Revisited; 8. Abraham Lincoln and  the Pursuit of Happiness; 9. Abraham Lincoln and the Family; 10. Slavery in the  Territories; 11. The Cooper Institute Address; 12. Abraham Lincoln and the “Hard  Spots” of Right-of-Revolution Doctine; 13. A Political Autobiography; Part Two:  The Lincoln Presidency. 1. Passion and Race Relations in the United States; 2.  Freedom of Speech and the Coming of the Civil War; 3. Secession and the Rule  of Law; 4. Abraham Lincoln at Independence Hall; 5. The Risks and Rewards of  Civil War; 6. Songs of the Civil War; 7. The Remarkable Practicality of the  Emancipation Proclamation; 8. Abraham Lincoln’s Four Annual Messages to  Congress; 9. Life and Death in Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address; 10.  Abraham Lincoln and Constitutional Amendments; 11. The Second Inaugural  Address; 12. Abraham Lincoln and the Aboriginal Peoples of North America; 13.  Superstition and Abraham Lincoln; Part Three: Looking Back to and Before the  Lincoln Presidency. 1. God in the Hands of an Angry Preacher; 2. The Geography  and Economics of Slavery; 3. Aaron Burr, an Ill-fated Genius; 4. Abraham  Lincoln, the Civil War Generals, and Slavery; 5. Justice Chipman and the  Perceived Greatness of Abraham Lincoln; 6. Abraham Lincoln’s Shakespeare; 7.   The “Shakespearean” John Wilkes Booth’s Abraham Lincoln; 8. Walt Whitman’s  Abraham Lincoln; 9. Nineteenth Century Giants: How Did They Matter? 10. A  Modern Realist’s Assessment of Abraham Lincoln; 11. Abraham Lincoln and the   Republican Party Today; 12. But for the Civil War…; 13. Golgotha on the  Potomac; Epilogue; Afterword by Eva. T. H. Brann [46 South Dakota Law  Review 666 (2001)]; End Notes; Index

C. Simply Unbelievable: Conversations with a Holocaust Survivor [Simcha Brudno (1924-2006)]

Introduction; I. Life, Death, and the Systematic Perversions of Law (March 23,  2000); II. European Jews, Their “Christian” Neighbors, and the Holocaust (March  30, 2000); III. A Return to Deadly Slavery in Twentieth-Century Europe (May 4,  2000; also published in a Spanish translation); IV. On the Relations of Slaves to  Masters Who Considered Them “Nothings” (May 25, 2000); V. What Were the  Germans Thinking (August 3, 2000); VI. Glory! Glory! Hallelujah! (August 10,  2000); VII. The Holocaust Museum and other Lessons (September 7, 2000); VIII. God, Please Choose Someone Else (September 14, 2000); IX.  The Terror of a Systematic Slaughter of Innocents (September 21, 2000); X. In  Eastern Europe, Anti-Semitism Is a Kind of Religion (September 28, 2000); XI.  Why the Jews? Don’t Expect to Explain Craziness in Rational Terms (October 5,  2000); XII. Are You Listening? (October 12, 2000); XIII. I Can’t Figure It Out to  this Day… (May 3, 2001) (See, for an account of the advance publication of some  of these conversations [including a publication in Spain], George Anastaplo,  “Why the Jews?” 35 Southern Illinois University Law Journal 401 [2011]. These  conversations, which were recorded in the Regenstein Library, The University of  Chicago, were transcribed by Adam Reinherz, who was then a student at the  Loyola University Chicago School of Law. The current availability of these  conversations in print has very much depended on both his diligence and his  knowledge of Jewish things. Several of these conversations have been posted on  anastaplo.wordpress).

D. September Eleventh: The ABC’s of a Citizen’s Responses

This is a running commentary (in the Thucydidean mode) in response by George  Anastaplo to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. (The first such response  was a talk, given September 12, 2001, at the Loyola University Chicago School of  Law, with the title, “A Second Pearl Harbor? Let’s Be Serious!”) Four collections  of these materials have been published thus far in the following law reviews: 29  Oklahoma City University Law Review 165-382 (2004); 4 Loyola University  Chicago International Law Review 135-65 (2006); 35 Oklahoma City University  Law Review 625-851 (2010); 9 Loyola University Chicago International Law  Review 297-325 (2012). Ramsey Clark, a University of Chicago Law School  classmate of George Anastaplo (Class of 1951), plans to provide the Foreword  when all of these, and any subsequent related, materials are brought together in  one collection.

E. In the Court of Public Opinion: Seven Decades of Letters to the Editor

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