Letter to the Editor: Times Literary Supplement

The Editors
Times Literary Supplement
3 Thomas More Square
London E98 lBS

Dear Editors:

George Steiner’s instructive review of Yvonne Sherratt’s Hitler’s Philosophers (“How private a Nazi?”, TLS, February 22, 2013, p. 5) recalls the disgraceful collaboration of distinguished German scholars with Hitler’s madness.

I have suggested the troubling character of the never-publicly-repudiated dealings with the Nazis by Martin Heidegger (who is currently “enjoying” a substantial resurgence in scholarly respectability) by identifying him as “the Macbeth of philosophy” (Macbeth, it should be remembered, may be the least repulsive of Shakespeare’s villains, but a villain nevertheless). I have examined the questionable doings of Martin Heidegger and various of his associates in essays posted on anastaplo.wordpress.com.

There may be found there as well the extensive bibliography of those associated with one of my teachers, Leo Strauss, a former student of Heidegger. It was good to have your review of Hitler’s Philosophers by someone who was a fellow student at the University of Chicago almost seven decades ago.
Respectfully yours,

George Anastaplo,
Professor of Law,
Loyola University Chicago

 

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2 Responses to Letter to the Editor: Times Literary Supplement

  1. Geert Van Cleemput says:

    What is G Anastaplo’s e-mail?

    Geert Van Clemput

  2. Sir,

    I feel quite doubtful writing you this, but I am doing it anyway trusting your understanding.

    I’ve been looking for some Strauss’ seminars for quite time now without being able to find them. They are the ones on Max Weber, Machiavelli and Nietzsche. I’ve just found the tape recording of one on the last mentioned philosopher.

    To be honest with you, I am no professional philosopher or teacher, but a retired business man from Spain using his free time to finally catch up with an old desire to read the great philosophers and make the most of it. I’ve been using the Strauss seminars, which seem directed to a non philosophical audience, to read Plato, Aristotle, Xenophon and Aristophanes. How new seem their works once (slowly) read in the conpany of Professor Strauss!

    Thanking you for your time, please excuse me for disturbing you from more important matters. And forgive my very por english.

    Yours sincerelly,

    Claudio Ortega

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