Curator’s Note: February 14, 2016

John Metz

At the beginning of his public presentations George Anastaplo often noted significant events associated with the date of the lecture or class. It thus seems appropriate that this posting be made on the second anniversary of his death.

Recently a special monograph on the life and work of George Anastaplo was published by Dialegs, an academic journal focused on social and political studies, originating from the INEHCA Foundation in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain ( http://www.inehca.cat/publicacions/). This issue was edited and coordinated by Professor Josep Monserrat, Dean of the Philosophy Faculty of the University of Barcelona, and Aida C. Rodríguez, researcher, lecturer and Ph.D. student at Ramon Llull University (twitter: @AidaC_Rodriguez). The cover of the issue is shown here:

CoverDialegs70.jpg

Below are posted the English versions of the essays by Aimee Anderson and me that were published in the journal in Catalan. As presented in the Journal, Aimee’s essay was introduced:

Bio:

Aimee B. Anderson received her JD degree from Loyola University of Chicago School of Law in 1984, having been a student in George Anastaplo’s first constitutional law seminar at that institution. After a national trial law practice for almost thirty years, Ms. Anderson took up editing, in the course of which she helped Anastaplo to produce the final two books of his Reflections series that were completed before his death.

Abstract:

George Anastaplo had an immense influence over many of those with whom he came into contact, either through his teaching, lectures, writings, or on an individual basis. His finest qualities, an insatiable curiosity, an unwavering courage, and the rare ability to evaluate the present while in the present, seem to have been a part of his character even at an early age, and they informed his actions throughout his life. Some of the episodes of Anastaplo’s life may have provided the source of these qualities, and others demonstrate their far-reaching effect.

My essay, which may be viewed as a foreword to Anastaplo’s blog, was introduced:

Bio:

John Metz received his B.A. degree from Saint Louis University in 1970, about the time he first encountered reports of George Anastaplo’s difficulties with the Illinois Bar. After performing alternative service at The University of Chicago Hospital instead of military service during the Vietnam War, he completed a Ph.D. in Biopsychology from The U. of C. in 1978 and pursued a research career in academic and private sectors. He continues research on sleep, mental illnesses, and neuroimaging.

Abstract

George Anastaplo believed that thoughtful human beings could discern an underlying order in the world in which we live. He was often critical of aspects of modern life, including the ever-spreading influence of technology and specifically of computers. His blog (https://anastaplo.wordpress.com/) developed from numerous chance events. Nevertheless, the blog was consistent with his behavior throughout his life and with his style of teaching.

As suggested in my essay, the blog was always a developing project. Whereas the blog should be viewed as complete as it stands, there were a number of features intended for inclusion that were not finished but may be useful to individual users of the blog. In particular, we were developing a “Scholar’s Version,” every word of whose contents could be found and viewed in context with the tools of a computer. This was to function somewhat like a concordance, one of Anastaplo’s favorite aids to research. Although it is still incomplete, I would be willing to share it on an “as is” basis with anybody who requests it by email to johnmetz@uchicago.edu.

 

 

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